210 New York minutes in Boston on January 20.

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Christian Wolff, Earle Brown, John Cage, David Tudor, and Morton Feldman in 1962; photo credit: Earle Brown Music Foundation

On Wednesday, January 20, Bostonians will have what appears to be a unique opportunity to hear three significant pieces by three major composers from the so-called New York School, crammed into 210 eventful minutes at two notable venues.

First, six performers from the Boston Conservatory – Andrew O’Shanick, Lauren Cook, Natalie Logan, Tzytle Steinman, Rachel Barg, and Simon Dyer – present John Cage’s Song Books throughout the Chinese art galleries at the Museum of Fine Arts. The presentation is scheduled to take place from 5:30pm to 7:30pm, and is free with museum admission. (More details here.)

If you’re willing to cut out just a little bit early – or if chance dictates that the Song Books presentation ends 10 minutes shy of its destination – then you can walk at a fast clip over to the New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall. There, the tireless and terrific Stephen Drury will play two seldom-encountered piano works by Cage’s friends and colleagues: Christian Wolff’s Suite (I), for prepared piano, and Morton Feldman’s For Bunita Marcus. (More details here.)

Although I’ve never tried it, I’m assured that the walk from the MFA to the NEC is a trifling eight minutes. Probably closer to five if you opt to walk like a New Yorker.

Me, I’m unable to attend either event, let alone both. Most likely I’ll be at my computer, listening to Earle Brown and David Tudor in melancholy isolation.

Original Source: 210 New York minutes in Boston on January 20.

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